7 Ways to Prepare Your Data Center for a Natural Disaster
RecoverySoft / July 20, 2018

No one wants to think about a disaster crippling or even destroying their data center. But even as hurricane season has ended for Atlantic and Gulf Coast states, wildfires are raging in Southern California. Earthquakes are an ever-present danger. Disaster planning is moving higher up in the priority list for many data center managers. Disaster recovery (DR) planning typically focuses on data protection and application availability. Most organizations consider the information maintained on servers and storage devices to be infinitely more valuable than the technology itself. However, DR plans should also include provisions for protecting equipment from physical damage. Location : Ideally, data centers would be located in a geographical area that's not prone to natural disaster. That's seldom possible, so organizations must do the best they can to isolate it from any disaster that does occur. That means locating the room in an interior room or at least as far away from windows as possible. In areas where hurricanes and tornadoes are the greatest threat, an underground location may be the best option (without flooding is a problem). In earthquake zones, it's critical to select a well-constructed building that's compatible with the latest codes. Backup Power : Power outages…

Enhanced Oil Recovery, Secondary, and Tertiary Recovery
RecoverySoft / April 16, 2018

Did you know that much of the oil in the ground is still present after primary recovery? In the kings english, that means there is still a lot of oil left in a well even after 10 years of pumping. The reason oil production slows is that the natural drive that once pushed oil aggressively towards the wellbore has subsided. Normally, the natural drive is either water or gas in the formation. In this article, we look to explain some of the common enhanced or secondary / tertiary methods of oil recovery. With oil hitting new highs every day, it is clear the cost benefit of utilizing technology to get at extra production makes sense. When oil was in the $ 10-20 range, the incremental cost of some enhanced oil recovery methods did not make economic sense. One of the most common secondary recovery methods is a waterflood. Essentially, a waterflood is a reintroduction of water into the formation to create a drive to push more oil towards the wellbore. To increase the efficiency of a waterflood, new methods utilize Alkaline-Surfactant-Polymer floods and some explorers are introducing microbes into the wellbore to increase the sweep efficiency of the flood, both…